Category Archives: multiplication

The Mobilization Flywheel

FlywheelI wore out a highlighter on an incredible 120 page book recently. It’s called The Mobilization Flywheel: Building a Culture of Biblical Mobilization by Larry Walkemeyer and Todd Wilson. You may recognize Todd’s name from the Exponential Conference. Mobilization is the 2019 Exponential theme. This book, along with companion resources, drives the point home of the needed shifts in today’s church. The big idea is that today’s church may just be holding people back from becoming all that God made them for. Do we see people as mere volunteers to prop up our ministries or as masterpieces, created by God for kingdom transformation?

The book focuses on three things – Missionaries, Gatherings, Church –

  • every believer is a missionary,
  • every church should be a mobilization station that sends its missionaries,
  • every believer can play a role in gatherings that share the gospel,
  • and many gatherings can become new churches led by everyday missionaries.

Simple, Biblical steps from Mobilization to Multiplication.

There’s even a great section on how denominations and networks can fuel mobilization and multiplication in the 21st century.

I’m ordering a box of these. Hope you’ll read it and get a passion for Mobilizing God’s Masterpieces for kingdom expansion. You can actually get a free E-book version HERE.

A few of my favorite quotes: 

  • The average church is always looking for more volunteers to do more church work. At the same time, the typical Christian is frequently seeking more purpose in their lives. 
  • The church trains volunteers to pass out bulletins, while Jesus trained his disciples to cast out demons. 
  • From start to finish the call of discipleship is to be sent, to live as sent ones, to live mobilized! 
  • The church has mostly lived a “Come and See” model while Jesus operated from a “Go and Be” model. 
  • Too often we see individuals as volunteers to fuel our programs and to serve our purposes rather than as everyday missionaries with everyday mission fields…. 
  • Leaders must shift from a bias of “We can do it, you can help” to one of “You can do it; how can we help?” 
  • Most so-called revivals these days prioritize greater sensations for the saved, instead of greater sending of the saved. 
  • Biblical discipleship always majored on going. Disciples were sent to make other disciples. Increasing maturity was evidenced by increased spiritual activity by disciples among non-believers. 
  • Biblical disciples are individuals who have determined their most significant accomplishments in life will be making disciples who make disciples. 
  • Biblical churches are churches who have embraced an operating system that prioritizes and practices equipping and sending believers to be disciples who in turn make disciples in their unique mission fields.
  • Is today’s church so pastor-centric that believers are motivated to climb upward in the church power structures instead of inspired to move outward into their mission fields?
  • Jesus knew that twelve multiplying disciples was a bigger number than 12,000 miracle seekers. 
  • Jesus trained disciples to cast out demons, but we settle for training believers to pass out bulletins and wonder why the average Christian is bored. 
  • There is a vast difference between volunteers filling a space and ordinary missionaries reaching an un-reached place.
  • We must shift our paradigm from recruiting volunteers to accomplish “our thing” to mobilizing everyday missionaries in their common and unique callings to accomplish “God’s thing.”
  • As Christian leaders, our paramount resource is not our building, our bank account, our band, etc…. It is the people the master has trusted us with leading.
  • Do I help believers dream about their “more” or try to limit their vision to inside our church’s ministry? 
  • Churches – prioritize helping members live into their calling outside the church more than inside the church …. Raising up everyday missionaries, not just volunteers for ministry …. Keep the church simple and mission-focused …. Not running programs but equipping members to reach and disciple people in their individual mission fields. 

Multiplication Eligible

Eligibility is a term we here in sports a lot. We want our teams to be Bowl eligible, playoff eligible. We get excited when the college star become draft eligible. Runners work to be eligible for the Boston Marathon, or other races. I’m encouraging my kids to get college eligible by working hard on their grades and ACT score.

Eligibility = readiness. It demonstrates that you are ready for the next step in maturity and growth or the next challenge. For churches, a great challenge is to get Multiplication Eligible. To be healthy enough for the challenges of multiplying new groups, new ministries, new locations, new churches. What does that look like?

  1. A Passion for God and the Lost.
  2. Healthy systems (evangelism, groups, gatherings, assimilation, mobilization, stewardship) that are producing new and growing disciples.
  3. Unity of purpose and mission.
  4. Eyes open to the needs of the world.
  5. Leader(s) that can be sent to lead the mission at the new location.

What do you need to work on in order to be Multiplication Eligible?

Mission and Multiplication Requires Margin

statistics-growing-on-whiteboard-vector-19234744.jpgMargin is defined as an amount by which a thing is won or falls short. And margin creates opportunities.

In sports – “We’re winning by a 25 point margin, so we can allow our substitute players to get playing time.”

In business – “Our sales have created a substantial margin this month, so we can afford to take a few advertising risks if we want.”

In church, margin can be more than enough money, more than enough volunteers, more than enough space to take risk and expand into a new area of ministry.

Multiplication requires margin. That’s the problem. Most churches today have little margin. We have too little or just enough money, volunteers, and space in the calendar, leaving very little for risk or new mission and ministry ventures.

It has gotten harder to create margin. Building and staff expenses have increased. People are harder to reach today than ever before. People are giving less to churches than ever before. People have less time, or believe that they do, than ever before. Churches must work harder and get creative in building, protecting, and strategically utilizing the margins for the growth of God’s kingdom.

“I just don’t have enough _____ to get involved in church planting right now.” He’s right. The margin for the multiplication of ministry is diminished for most churches.

How can we create margin?

  1. Assess ministries to determine their effectiveness and work to eliminate those that are no longer fruitful. This could create some margin and momentum for other areas.
  2. Look for margin that may be unrecognized. Can you duplicate a ministry that your are preparing already into another sphere. Example: One church does VBS at their location, then at local private daycare’s. That’s multiplication, that took little extra prep by volunteers.
  3. Take an assessment of the amount of time people spend on ministry inside the church. If its more than 12-15 hours, its probably cutting into the time they have for ministry in the neighborhood, marketplace, or community. People work 40 hours per week and probably have another 10-12 to volunteer. Explore ways to help people put ministry and volunteer hours toward the unchurched around them. This is the least common denominator of kingdom growth. This is the path to margin for our churches.
  4. Assess empty space around you. Most communities have lots of empty space that can be used for ministry. Instead of always thinking about building new (which almost always robs us of margin, or will in the future), consider ministries that may can fit empty space around you. Example: I visited one church that turned neighboring empty buildings into ministry space, saving the church a ton of money in new construction costs and building good will in the community by sparing potential blighted property.
  5. Margins are created by healthy growth, facilitated by healthy systems. Consider working on strengthening the systems of your church. Check out this Systems Analysis Tool to get started.

If multiplication is desired, margin should be on your mind as a ministry leader.

What other ways can we create margin for ministry, missions, and multiplication?

Questions:

  • Is your church creating margin through healthy growth of disciples?
  • What are you planning for future margins?
  • What is the thing keeping you from having margin for multiplication and ministry right now?
  • What are of your ministry has the most margin right now?  How can you multiply it?
  • Do people have enough margin in their life to perform the least common denominator of kingdom growth – Gospel Sharing with Friends and neighbors?

 

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