Lord, Help Me Close the Door on the Devil

On Wednesday of Holy Week, Judas set in motion his plan to betray Jesus. At dinner in Bethany, a woman broke an expensive bottle of perfume and used it to anoint Jesus (Matthew 26:6–13; Mark 14:3–9; John 12:1–8). Judas protested, that it could have been used to care for the poor. Jesus defended the woman, spurning Judas’ opinion. The next scene has Judas making his offer to the religious leaders who wanted Jesus arrested and questioned. The arrangement was made and Judas began looking for the right opportunity to betray Jesus.

What do we know about Judas? A few things:

  1. He was called by Jesus and he obeyed and followed. None of Jesus’ disciples were perfect. Studying what we know of them, we find flaws, just as we can find flaws in ourselves and probably everyone at our church. Jesus is not looking for perfect, but available. Judas had been called and he obeyed and followed Jesus.
  2. He was not suspected to be dishonest. No one knew who the betrayer was. Judas always has a crooked nose and evil grin in my minds pictures. However, Judas kept the money bag, so he was trusted by the disciples and by Jesus, though evil intent was found in his heart in hindsight.
  3. The gospel writers paint him with hindsight as a thief, stingy, greedy, and glory seeking. And he probably was, but no one suspected it or accused him of such before his kiss of betrayal.

What happened to Judas?

Some commentators point to the stern correction that Jesus gave to Judas after the perfume was spilled as a significant moment in his life. Correction can be for us an opportunity to grow wise or an opportunity to grow bitter (see Proverbs 10:17; 15:10). This event may have been a tipping point for Judas’ heart. His pride and bitterness opened the door for the devil. That’s what anger and bitterness can do. Paul in speaking of anger, says to not hold onto it “and don’t give the devil an opportunity” (Ephesians 4:26-27). Could it be that Satan can take the opportunity of a slight, our anger at someone’s word or actions, or our hurt pride at a spurned idea to make a betrayer out of us? 

Luke says that Satan entered Judas (Luke 22:3). John says that “the devil…PUT INTO the heart of Judas…to betray” (John 13:2). The Greek word translated “put into” is the word for thrust or cast or throw. This image should remind us of the armor of God and the shield of faith that help us “extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one” (Ephesians 6:16).

It’s easy to read the story of Judas and think, “I’d never do that.” Or to think of all those wicked, crooked nosed betrayers out there. Or to think of someone that has betrayed us or those we love. But the story of Judas should cause us to ask, “Is the seed of betrayal alive in me?” or “Am I opening the door for the devil?” You might find the seed or the opened door in your relational pain. Have you held on to a grievance when someone offended you? Are you holding someone else responsible for your unheeded ideas or unmet needs? Have you harbored anger at someone for longer than a few days without letting it go? Let’s remember Judas and close the door on the devil by forgiving, receiving correction with humility, putting faith in Jesus, and remaining faithful followers. 

Lord, help me close the door on the devil. If the seed of betrayal lives in me, convict me that I may forgive and follow you. Thank you for providing the shield of faith that can keep us safe from Satan’s arrows. I want to be a faithful follower and friend until death. Protect me from anger, bitterness, and unforgiveness.     

About Lane Corley

I am - Follower of Jesus Christ - Husband to the beautiful and patient Heather Corley - Father of two young men: Jackson (17), Hudson (13). And one Princess: Katherine Jubilee or “Kate” (7) - Church Planter / Church Planting Strategist for the Louisiana Baptist Convention. - When I can I’m reading, gardening, deer hunting, on mission with my church. - Hoping to be helpful to others & fruitful for God.

Posted on April 8, 2020, in Devotional, Holy Week, Thru the Bible. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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